So your career path isn’t’ quite going in the direction you once anticipated – what next?

Picture it, you’ve done the ‘due diligence’ steps to ensure that you get that great career you wanted.  You went to college, ate Ramen noodles and pizza until you thought you were going to turn into a pepperoni, worked odd-end jobs along the way for pocket change and then VOILA!  You’ve got your degree, the world is your oyster, so you ask “where is my corner office, baby!”

In a second scenario, you went the path where you opted to enter the workforce right after high school, putting your degree on hold.  Maybe you picked up some certifications, took some courses in order to strengthen your marketability along the way – because right now, hey, you’re making some real money while gaining some great corporate experience, you’re treating your broke college friends every time you go out, and you’re thinking “it doesn’t get any better than this, it’s only a matter of time before someone recognizes the dues I’m paying to get to that corner office!”

Fast forward about five years; you’re updating your resume – again.  Your job at that company that you thought would let you in based on your amazing collegiate education has eliminated the contractors right at the end of their contract, and yes, you were one of them – not a performance based restructure, strictly a budgetary decision.

In our second scenario, you’ve been at this company for quite a few years now; you’ve networked and built some great relationships in your division.  However, you’ve watched people come in after you and almost immediately get promoted.  It’s official – you are frustrated, you’re wondering if you’d made the right decisions early in your career when you decided not to get that college degree…  What is next?
I’ve had the experience on both ends of the pendulum, and I can tell you that one takeaway from all of the ‘stop and go’ is this: be ready and willing to ADJUST to rapidly can you buy doxycycline changing environments and situations.

When I say changing environments, I encourage you to be open to other industries as well.  This will improve your knowledge base, and also the network of professionals that will get to know and love you (OK I’m very glass half-full optimistic haha).  Being in the human resources industry, you get to review a plethora of candidate backgrounds; I can only say that there is no blueprint for absolute success and there are pros & cons for all different backgrounds.

For example, an employer may see someone who has been at one company for many years, who has had a couple of promotions while at this company, but the concern sometimes will be: are they set in their ways, are they coachable, are they willing and open to learning new technologies? On the other hand, a hiring manager may see another candidate who has not stayed with one company for more than 2 or 3 years; however, their skill set and diverse experience is really impressive.  The concern for that individual would be whether they have the ability to commit to a company in order for the employer to enjoy a return on investment – will that candidate jump ship as soon as they exhaust the company benefits?

I believe that both individuals would be valuable assets to any corporation, so long as the following is adhered to in terms of professional development:

  • Always be open to conversing with any and all individuals (no matter what their title, because you never know who THEY know)
  • Keep up with new technologies and skills
  • Join organizations that can improve your visibility to others

Remember, we’ve all had our shares of ‘no’s’, but don’t wallow in the pity party – have your moment, and then move forward with positivity and new solutions!

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