Candidate experience: Exciting times ahead for 2018

Candidate experience is defined as how job seekers perceive and react to employers’ sourcing, recruiting, interviewing, hiring, and onboarding processes. Now let’s re-wind 10 years to when a candidate would be dropping their CVs on reception desks or better yet faxing them through speculatively and not getting a reply of any sort, to 5 years to when a 7 stage interview at major banking firms for example was standard, putting people through all types of psychometric, mental assessments and no doubt see how they cope under extreme pressure!  To present day, I’ve noticed that the candidate experience has changed quite considerably, for the better – I hope….

 

2 major reasons why it is now more exciting than ever from a candidate experience perspective.

 

Technology advances

 

Candidates will have further opportunity to engage with the latest tech advances that companies are embracing. Many companies are hiring a high number of people in certain areas, such as in retail or at a graduate level. So previously when applying for a position alongside 100s, sometimes 1000s of people – you wouldn’t get a look in. Now companies are selecting more candidates to screen initially by opting to send them a video interview. Yes you heard it, you talk to your camera – answering pre-decided questions by your potential employer. Saves the company time, allows you as a candidate to prepare for it and you do the video in your own time.

 

I’ve also noticed technology has improved convenience for the candidate. Imagine this, you apply for a position on your mobile phone, 20 mins later you get sent a link to do a video interview, 24 hours later you get invited to come and do a face to face interview – the confirmation details sent to you via text message as well as lots of videos about the company for you to research. After the interview you are sent a message asking you to give feedback and your thoughts, then an offer is made.

 

Rise of social media

 

Previously a candidate would be somewhat unsure what their new co-workers might be like. They may be preparing themselves over the weekend before starting a new job on Monday, guessing what the culture might be like for example – Do people socialise at lunch? Will anyone mind if I drop my kids off on Tuesdays and Wednesdays? Will people work way beyond the 40 hours on the contract?…All pretty legitimate questions. However now I’ve seen a trend which allows candidates to use the tools they have access to, to try and work out these answers before they have even stepped into an interview.

 

Social media has become a really important tool to attract talent. What companies should be portraying is all of the great things that are actually happening on a day-to-day basis to attract people. Whether that be the social aspect – of going for lunch with colleagues , the flexibility and inclusion to allow employees to do drop offs and pick-ups or to portray a work ethic that goes above and beyond expectation and competitors. My view is, if it’s happening and a company is proud of it – then via social media this can be portrayed. Many companies are not quite there yet, but I think 2018 will see a rise of this type of talent acquisition strategy, ultimately improving the candidate experience.

 

I’d love to hear from people who have first-hand had a positive or negative candidate experience due to the advancement in technology and/or the rise in social media. Please share your experience.

 

 

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By |2018-08-24T13:04:49+00:00February 12th, 2018|Categories: Opinion|0 Comments

About the Author:

mm
Max graduated with an Advertising & Brand Management degree in 2005. He has been recruiting for 10+ years with a special focus on innovation projects and creative sourcing strategies. Joining PeopleScout in Jan 2016, on the Lendlease account. Max has written articles in national industry publications, with interests around advancement in technology, continuous improvement, and diversity in the workplace. A keen cricketer, player, and spectator with influences on his playing being from the likes of the heavy hitting Kevin Peterson and flamboyant style of Vic Richards.

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